News & Publishing, Printing and Imaging

Lean Manufacturing: Doing More with Less in the Pressroom

By Gretchen A. Peck

Efficiency is precisely why Dow Jones & Company, Inc. prints The Wall Street Journal at strategic points across the nation. The obvious benefit is that it “gets the Journal closer to our customers,” according to vice president of production Larry Hoffman. There was a time when the publisher operated its own printing plants — 17 back then — but today it relies more heavily on print suppliers, bringing the total number of sites printing The Wall Street Journal (and a mounting volume of commercial print) to 26, Hoffman said.

Read more at: https://www.editorandpublisher.com/feature/doing-more-with-less-in-the-pressroom/

Published by Editor & Publisher magazine, May 2014

Printing and Imaging

The Great Debate: Inkjet Printheads

By Gretchen A. Peck

There are a lot of variables throughout the print process. For example, the quality of the graphics, media choice, and the lighting and environmental conditions at the installation point. All of these factors contribute to the overall success of a print job. The same is true for how consumables and the print technology itself, including printheads, work together.

“Printheads are a crucial area of printer design, and what differentiates one printer manufacturer from another,” explains Mark Radogna, product manager, professional imaging, Epson.

Hardware manufacturers decide what type of printhead—piezo or thermal—to place in a device based on many factors. These include temperature and ink chemistry.

Read more at: http://www.digitaloutput.net/the-great-debate/

Published by Digital Output magazine, April 2014

Printing and Imaging

Answering the riddle of environmentally friendly media

By Gretchen A. Peck

Though printing celebrates significant progress in its efforts to be more environmentally considerate, large format still has a long way to go—starting with how the industry at large deals with media. Part of the reason why large format graphics may be lagging behind is confusion.

Casually tossed-about terms like sustainable, “green,” and environmentally responsible are relative to one another. Is media green if it isn’t comprised of some percentage of recycled material? Is it green only if it can be inserted into standard recycling streams? Can substrates be green if they have to be finished with the introduction of a chemical-based solution? Is it green if it can be used and reused with ease, without loss of integrity, such as textile-based print?

Print service providers (PSPs) are tasked with juggling these questions and supplying answers to their customers. In return, they look to media vendors to provide sustainable products. Here, we profile PSPs who are helping solve the sustainable media riddle.

Read more at: http://www.digitaloutput.net/answering-the-riddle/

Publishing by Digital Output magazine, May 2014

Printing and Imaging

Prototyping and Short-Run Packaging

By Gretchen A. Peck

Without question, digital inkjet has transformed virtually every segment of the print industry—commercial print, sign and graphics, books, and publications. Many predicted that digital inkjet would also transform packaging—not in the sense that long-run inkjet production would entirely replace more traditional print methods like flexography, screenprinting, and offset. Rather, it was seen as an enabler to the creative process, allowing for better comping, prototyping, and in some cases, short-run production.

However, since the advent of quality roll-fed and flatbed print engines, digital inkjet printing has yet to live up to its packaging potential.

Read more at: http://www.dpsmagazine.com/prototyping-and-short-run-packaging/

Published by DPS Magazine, July 2014

 

Printing and Imaging

Packaging Promises

By Gretchen A. Peck

There’s been a lot of punditry and speculation about how digital print will impact packaging printing, whether it would go the way of commercial print, with shorter print runs and variable data-driven versioning. However, after more than a decade of predictions that digital print—narrow and wide format—would forever alter the packaging landscape, they’ve yet to manifest.

When having a conversation about “packaging,” it’s important to be specific about its sub-segments, suggests Simon Lewis, director, strategic marketing for Hewlett-Packard’s (HP) Indigo Division, who categorizes package printing as labels and label-like products such as shrink sleeves, folding carton, flexible packaging, and “others,” which include specialty packages produced using more exotic media such as metal and glass.

Read more at: http://www.dpsmagazine.com/packaging-promises/

Publishes by DPS Magazine, May 2014